Tampere Universities calculated their carbon footprint

Tampere Universities calculated their carbon footprint

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The identification of carbon emission sources is an important step towards achieving this goal

The calculation of the carbon footprint of Tampere Universities has been completed. The carbon footprint sums up all the emissions generated by the activities of Tampere University and Tampere University of Applied Sciences, which are committed to becoming carbon neutral by 2030. The identification of carbon emission sources is an important step towards achieving this goal.

The carbon footprint of both Tampere University and Tampere University of Applied Sciences was now calculated for the first time. The calculation captured the sources of carbon emissions for both institutions, including work-related travel, building maintenance and laboratory activities.

The overall carbon footprint of Tampere Universities is 29 000 tCO2eqv (metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents). Tampere University’s share is approximately 25 000 tons. In 2019, the largest sources of carbon dioxide emissions were travel (41%), buildings (27%) and research infrastructures (23%). Heating accounts for the majority of building-related carbon emissions, although a significant share of district heating in Tampere is already produced using renewable energy sources and their share continues to climb.

The carbon footprint was calculated by the multidisciplinary Carbon Group made up of representatives of both Tampere University and Tampere University of Applied Sciences.“The calculation of our carbon footprint marks an important milestone in our journey towards a more sustainable university community and carbon neutrality. When we consider potential measures to reduce emissions, it is also important to take into account the positive impacts of our activities,” say Vice Presidents Kirsi Viskari and Marja Sutela who chair the Carbon Group.

Work-related travel and buildings generate the majority of emissions at both Tampere University and Tampere University of Applied Sciences. At Tampere University, the share of emissions from travel (42%) exceeds that of Tampere University of Applied Sciences, where work-related trxavel accounts for 34% of the carbon footprint.

At TAMK, the share of building-related emissions exceeds that of Tampere University (TAMK 43%; Tampere University 25%).

The differences are attributed, among other things, to the number of properties and the size of staff in the institutions.

Tampere Universities are committed to becoming carbon neutral by 2030. Achieving this goal requires a substantial reduction of carbon emissions. Accordingly, Tampere Universities will prepare a roadmap that outlines the steps to be taken towards carbon neutrality. The process will begin this spring by identifying ways for the community to cut emissions without it affecting education, research and societal impact and thereby promoting sustainable development. In addition, we will map out suitable measures for offsetting carbon emissions and fostering a culture of sustainability across the Tampere Universities community.

Source: Tampere University

Tampere Universities calculated their carbon footprint

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